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The Showdown: Personal Computers

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The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Thu 24 Apr 2008 - 22:18

First topic message reminder :

In today's world technology is progressing very rapidly and one common example is computer technology. Being myself a computer enthusiast, I build my own PCs and I find it very interesting trying to keep pace with its evolution.

I have recently upgraded my latest computer which I initially built a year ago. The upgrade consisted mainly of replacing some buggy peripherals and improving the thermal solution so as to allow future overclocking of the system.

Initial configuration:
  • Chassis: Asus Vento TA-88
  • Power Supply Unit: Cooler Master eXtreme Power 550W
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS4 (Rev. 3.3)
  • Central Processing Unit: Intel Core 2 Duo E6600
  • Central Processing Unit Cooler: Asus P5A2
  • Memory: 2 x 1GB Kingston DDR2-667
  • Visual Graphics Accelerator: Gigabyte GV-NX88S320H-B-RH
  • Audio: Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic
  • Optical Drive: Asus DRW-1814BLT
  • Hard Disk Drive: Hitachi Deskstar T7K250 200GB SATA2
  • Card Reader/Writer: Generic Internal 3.5" All-In-One
  • Monitor: Asus MM17D
  • Keyboard & Mouse: Logitech Cordless Internet Pro Desktop Combo
  • Printer, Copier & Scanner: HP F380
  • Speakers: Logitech Z-5500 Digital
  • Webcam: Logitech QuickCam Fusion


Space was limited and there wasn't any other cooler mounted except for the CPU, VGA and PSU.


The HDD had to be mounted in the 5.25" bay because of the monster VGA.


The initial build.

Actual configuration:
  • Chassis: Gigabyte 3D Mars
  • Power Supply Unit: Cooler Master eXtreme Power 550W
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS4 (Rev. 3.3)
  • Central Processing Unit: Intel Core 2 Duo E6600
  • Central Processing Unit Cooler: Gigabyte 3D Rocket II
  • Memory: 2 x 1GB Kingston DDR2-667
  • Visual Graphics Accelerator: Gigabyte GV-NX88S320H-B-RH
  • Audio: Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic
  • Optical Drive: Sony Nec Optiarc AW-G170S
  • Hard Disk Drive: 2 x Western Digital Caviar SE 160GB SATA2
  • Card Reader/Writer: Generic Mini External All-In-One
  • Monitor: Asus MM17D
  • Keyboard & Mouse: Logitech Cordless Internet Pro Desktop Combo
  • Printer, Copier & Scanner: HP F380
  • Speakers: Logitech Z-5500 Digital
  • Webcam: Logitech QuickCam Fusion


My new set of wealth... Razz


The 3D Rocket II stands at an impressive 16 cm on the Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 and has
two fans mounted, one at the bottom to cool the area around the LGA 775 socket and
one at the top which eliminates the heat coming from the processor via the heat-pipes.


WOW... It's so spacious inside.


The DVD burner, the fan controller and the front panel connectivities.


Simple, sleek and stylish!

As already underlined, the principal idea behind the upgrade was to improve the cooling system of the computer. Before, the temperatures I used to record with the Asus P5A2 were as follows:

Idle
  • Central Processing Unit: 34 - 40 degrees Celsius
  • Chipset: 54 degrees Celsius
  • Visual Graphics Accelerator: 63 degrees Celsius
  • Hard Disk Drive: 49 degrees Celsius

Medium Load
  • Central Processing Unit: 41 - 47 degrees Celsius
  • Chipset: 57 degrees Celsius
  • Visual Graphics Accelerator: 63 degrees Celsius
  • Hard Disk Drive: 50 degrees Celsius

Gaming/Full Load
  • Central Processing Unit: 48 - 64 degrees Celsius
  • Chipset: 62 degrees Celsius
  • Visual Graphics Accelerator: 74 degrees Celsius
  • Hard Disk Drive: 50 degrees Celsius

Now, the results speak for themselves... Very Happy


Thanks to the 9 cooling fans! geek

This temperature reading was taken while writing this topic and I should admit that it was pretty shocking to see the CPU dissipating a heat of only 23 degrees Celsius with its cooler set to run at its minimum level (Silent: ~1500 RPM & 16 dB) while room temperature was 30 degrees Celsius.

I will be back with some more results soon but in the meantime I want to hear a bit about your computers and also, what you think about mine.


Last edited by Varun on Wed 20 Aug 2008 - 12:31; edited 7 times in total

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Tue 28 Apr 2009 - 21:17

Varun wrote:And Prithvi, here are the specifications of my Gigabyte Superb 720 in case you want more details...

What do AC INPUT, ATX 12cm, PFC, DC OUTPUT, Max Combined Wattage mean? And how do they work in your PC?


Varun wrote:Now, here are the results of some early benchmarks...


Click to open in pop-up window.
In the pop-up window for 3DMark06, there are some details such as SM2.0 Graphics Test, HDR/SM3.0 Graphics Tests under the Tests subtitle and Anti-Aliasing, HLSL VS Target, HLSL PS Target under the Settings subtitle which I'm unable to understand. Embarassed


Varun wrote:The temperatures were as follows after setting the GPU fan at 50%...

Why is ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series [W1943] written when you've bought an ATI Radeon HD Series 4870? Also, why is [W1943] written in the end? scratch

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Jeet on Sun 3 May 2009 - 15:35

Wawa. Nissa net.
Be mo pe pense kitsoz moi.
Kan to pu met mo Pc a jour kuma pu toi?
Pa fer nanien sa, to koner tou sa bann zafer twe meter kot toi, mo si mo gagne anvi meter kot moi.
Li comme si direr ene desire oubien (mo pas pe koner kuma mo pu express mo mem) li kome si direr ene want/need pu sa bann zafer, ki to dir Varun? Wink
Sa facon to upgrade to Pc la, li tro top. Cool

Ey bann users mo ena 1 ou 2 questions la, mo pas koner si li vrai:
Mo prof computer leson, mo demande li ki l'ecran, card graphic, ek power supply ki plis puissant?
Li dir moi ki pu l'écran Viewsonic meilleur, pu card graphics li dir 9400 GT meilleur ki 8800 GTS ek kan mo dir li mo ena ene power supply CoolerMaster 550W, li dir ki mone gaspille mo l'argent parseki sa power supply la ine fer zis pu bann servers.

Alors ki zot l'opinion Question

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by visham on Wed 6 May 2009 - 4:22

ahahahahhahaha.. vrai m 1 prof ha? Razz

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Jeet on Tue 12 May 2009 - 14:30

Ey dir zot, eski li vrai seki line dir Question

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Thu 14 May 2009 - 9:25

Sneha wrote:What do AC INPUT, ATX 12cm, PFC, DC OUTPUT, Max Combined Wattage mean? And how do they work in your PC?
Electricity flows in two ways; either in alternating current (AC) or in direct current (DC). The word electricity comes from the fact that current is nothing more than moving electrons along a conductor, like a wire, that have been harnessed for energy. Therefore, the difference between AC and DC has to do with the direction in which the electrons flow. In DC, the electrons flow steadily in a single direction, or "forward". In AC, the electrons keep switching directions, sometimes going "forward" and then going "backward".

The power that comes from our wall outlets is AC, the more common and efficient kind. A power supply unit can be described as a transformer (something which can bump or decrease voltages whenever needed). Don't forget, a computer uses very low voltages for its components. So, the power supply should be fed with an alternating current, which it then turns into direct current for the different rails it has to feed (+3.3V, +5V, -12V and so on). That's why you see specifications about AC/DC input for the PSU.

Max combined wattage means the total continuous power the power supply unit can feed to the computer and peak wattage means the total maximum power it can feed the computer for a very short period of time, let's say one minute.

ATX is simply a form factor specifying the standard sizes for different computer components as they should be of reasonable sizes to fit inside the computer case (chassis). In this case, it's about the PSU fan which has a diameter of 12 cm.

Power Factor Correction (PFC) allows power distribution to operate at its maximum efficiency. There are two types of PFC, Active PFC and Passive PFC. The preferable type of PFC is Active Power Factor Correction (Active PFC) since it provides more efficient power frequency. Because Active PFC uses a circuit to correct power factor, Active PFC is able to generate a theoretical power factor of over 95%. Active Power Factor Correction also diminishes total harmonics, automatically corrects for AC input voltage and is capable of a full range of input voltage. Since Active PFC is the more complex method of Power Factor Correction, it is more expensive to produce an Active PFC power supply.

The most common type of PFC is Passive Power Factor Correction (Passive PFC). Passive PFC uses a capacitive filter at the AC input to correct poor power factor. Passive PFC may be affected when environmental vibration occurs. Passive PFC requires that the AC input voltage be set manually. Passive PFC also does not use the full energy potential of the AC line.

Non-PFC power supplies also exist but they are rare to find and not recommended for today's computers.

Sneha wrote:In the pop-up window for 3DMark06, there are some details such as SM2.0 Graphics Test, HDR/SM3.0 Graphics Tests under the Tests subtitle and Anti-Aliasing, HLSL VS Target, HLSL PS Target under the Settings subtitle which I'm unable to understand. Embarassed
SM stands for Shader Model and its latest version is SM4.1. A shader is a set of instructions used to calculate rendering effects on a graphical processing unit.

High Level Shader Language (HLSL) is a shading language developed by Microsoft for use with the Microsoft Direct3D API. HLSL programs are available in three forms, vertex shaders (HLSL VS Target), geometry shaders (HLSL GS), and pixel shaders (HLSL PS Target).

Anti-Aliasing is a technique of minimizing the distortion artifacts when representing a high-resolution signal at a lower resolution. We can have effects of anti-aliasing ranging from 2X to 24X depending on the GPU used. The higher the effect of anti-aliasing, the more it stresses the GPU affecting the performance of the application in terms of frames per second (FPS).

Sneha wrote:Why is ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series [W1943] written when you've bought an ATI Radeon HD Series 4870? Also, why is [W1943] written in the end? scratch
This is because the HD 4870 (code named RV770 XT) belongs to the HD 4800 series (code named RV770). There are 3 + 1 variants in the 4800 family, namely, HD 4830 (RV770 LE), HD 4850 (RV770 Pro), HD 4870 (RV770 XT) and HD 4890 (RV790 XT). The RV790 is an enhanced version of the RV770 GPU.

The GPU is always associated with the monitor because it projects everything on the latter and that is why you see [W1943] besides the ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series label on the ATI Catalyst Control Center. W1943 is the model of my LG LCD monitor, LG W1943S.

Jeet wrote:Ey bann users mo ena 1 ou 2 questions la, mo pas koner si li vrai:
Mo prof computer leson, mo demande li ki l'ecran, card graphic, ek power supply ki plis puissant?
Li dir moi ki pu l'écran Viewsonic meilleur, pu card graphics li dir 9400 GT meilleur ki 8800 GTS ek kan mo dir li mo ena ene power supply CoolerMaster 550W, li dir ki mone gaspille mo l'argent parseki sa power supply la ine fer zis pu bann servers.

Alors ki zot l'opinion Question
visham wrote:ahahahahhahaha.. vrai m 1 prof ha? Razz
Jeet wrote:Ey dir zot, eski li vrai seki line dir Question
lol!...

The current LCD monitor market is dominated by a handful of players who manufacture the displays themselves. Samsung, LG (previously known as LG-Philips) and AU are the most cited manufacturers and virtually every retail LCD, be it Acer, Asus, Dell, HP or ViewSonic, contains a panel from one of the trio.

In the mid-1990s, ViewSonic rose to become one of the top-rated makers of computer CRT monitors, alongside Sony, NEC, MAG Innovision, and Panasonic. ViewSonic soon displaced the rest of these companies to emerge as the largest display manufacturer from America/Japan at the turn of the century. More recently, ViewSonic has been overtaken by Korean giants, Samsung and LG, as the latter were at the forefront of fledging LCD technology.

I hope you can now judge which LCD manufacturer is/are the best. Wink

Now, someone telling you that a GeForce 9400 GT is better than a GeForce 8800 GTS is a real joker because the GeForce 9400 GT has a memory bandwidth of only 12.8 GB/s, 16 shader processors and a 128-bit bus whereas the 8800 GTS has a memory bandwidth of 64 GB/s, 96 shader processors and a 320-bit bus. Now, if you own an overclocked GPU, it will yield better performance than the stock one.

Of course, the GeForce 9 series is newer than the GeForce 8 series but all GeForce 9 series and some GeForce 100/200 series are all re-badged GeForce 8 series.

For the PSU, for sure, your computer teacher can run his GeForce 9400 GT with any generic PSU out there but to power the GeForce 8800 GTS you will need a dual +12V rail and 500W PSU with active PFC at the very minimum. Just to tell you, I needed a Gigabyte Superb 720 to be able to run my Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 1 GB Toxic Edition at its maximum potential because we are talking about a memory bandwidth of 128 GB/s here (the stock HD 4870 has 115.2 GB/s of memory bandwidth) and that's more than the newer Radeon HD 4890 which has 124.8 GB/s of memory bandwidth.

Jeet, if I were in your place, I would have never gone to such a computer teacher for tuition but you know what? You should invite him here so that he learns a bit more about computers.

Anyway, don't forget to check my updated benchmarking results and the full review of my computer system at www.VarunRamburn.co.nr by next week, time for me to update the website. Wink

Varun
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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Thu 14 May 2009 - 11:52

Now I understand the computer language better. Smile Still there are more queries which I need you, people, to shed some light for me...

Varun wrote:The most common type of PFC is Passive Power Factor Correction (Passive PFC). Passive PFC uses a capacitive filter at the AC input to correct poor power factor.
What is the poor power factor in this case?

Varun wrote:Non-PFC power supplies also exist but they are rare to find and not recommended for today's computers.
Why are they rare to find and why are they not recommended for today's computers? Also, in what way are they benefical and disadvantageous?

Sneha wrote:In the pop-up window for 3DMark06, there are some details such as SM2.0 Graphics Test, HDR/SM3.0 Graphics Tests under the Tests subtitle and Anti-Aliasing, HLSL VS Target, HLSL PS Target under the Settings subtitle which I'm unable to understand. Embarassed
Varun wrote:High Level Shader Language (HLSL) is a shading language developed by Microsoft for use with the Microsoft Direct3D API.
Microsoft Direct3D API, what is that? scratch

Sneha wrote:Why is ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series [W1943] written when you've bought an ATI Radeon HD Series 4870? Also, why is [W1943] written in the end? scratch
Varun wrote:There are 3 + 1 variants in the 4800 family, namely, HD 4830 (RV770 LE), HD 4850 (RV770 Pro), HD 4870 (RV770 XT) and HD 4890 (RV790 XT).
What does 3 + 1 indicate?

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Thu 14 May 2009 - 20:22

Sneha wrote:Now I understand the computer language better. Smile Still there are more queries which I need you, people, to shed some light for me...

Varun wrote:The most common type of PFC is Passive Power Factor Correction (Passive PFC). Passive PFC uses a capacitive filter at the AC input to correct poor power factor.
What is the poor power factor in this case?
Let me give you an example of poor power factor... If you're using a 20A breaker and are drawing a total of 15A in "real power" and the power factor is only 70% then, you are drawing an apparent 21.4A, thus overloading the breaker.

Sneha wrote:
Varun wrote:Non-PFC power supplies also exist but they are rare to find and not recommended for today's computers.
Why are they rare to find and why are they not recommended for today's computers? Also, in what way are they benefical and disadvantageous?
They are rare to find because they are simply outdated now. Today's computers are very sensitive to electricity fluctuations and PFC PSUs are the most suitable.

A case of poor power factor can increase your electricity bill a lot. Let me explain... Suppose your computer require 200W to work at full load. Then, we can assume that a 250W PSU will surely do the job. However, this doesn't really happen in the real world. Let's now assume that the PSU has a power factor of 75%. Then, you will need a PSU which will be able to output 267W at the very minimum and you should also bear in mind that after a long period of usage a PSU loses its initial efficiency. This is why you should always use good quality PSUs, not generic ones.

Sneha wrote:
Sneha wrote:In the pop-up window for 3DMark06, there are some details such as SM2.0 Graphics Test, HDR/SM3.0 Graphics Tests under the Tests subtitle and Anti-Aliasing, HLSL VS Target, HLSL PS Target under the Settings subtitle which I'm unable to understand. Embarassed
Varun wrote:High Level Shader Language (HLSL) is a shading language developed by Microsoft for use with the Microsoft Direct3D API.
Microsoft Direct3D API, what is that? scratch
Direct3D is an application programming interface (API) and is used to render three dimensional graphics in applications where performance is important, such as games. Direct3D also allows applications to run fullscreen instead of embedded in a window, though they can still run in a window if programmed for that feature. Direct3D uses hardware acceleration if it is available on the graphics card, allowing for hardware acceleration of the entire 3D rendering pipeline or even only partial acceleration. It also exposes other advanced features such as anti-aliasing.

Sneha wrote:
Sneha wrote:Why is ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series [W1943] written when you've bought an ATI Radeon HD Series 4870? Also, why is [W1943] written in the end? scratch
Varun wrote:There are 3 + 1 variants in the 4800 family, namely, HD 4830 (RV770 LE), HD 4850 (RV770 Pro), HD 4870 (RV770 XT) and HD 4890 (RV790 XT).
What does 3 + 1 indicate?
I said 3 + 1 because as already mentioned, the first three members of the HD 4800 series uses the RV770 chip whereas the HD 4890 uses a re-designed RV770 chip called RV790.

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Jeet on Fri 15 May 2009 - 19:31

Papaooooo.
Sa si mo pas ti koner.
Merci Sneha pu ki tone poz sa bann questions la.
Ek Varun eski 9800 (pa koner ki zafer, n'importe 'GT/GTX' ou soi pa koner kieter) ek 9400 GTX plis fort ki 8800 GTS.

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Tue 9 Jun 2009 - 13:59

No problem, Zit... Wink

Well, I have some more queries concerning what has been stated in the website. In Hardware Overview, under the THX-certified Sound System subtitle, Varun has written:
The Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic has a signal-to-noise ratio of 109 dB and a frequency response of 10 Hz to 48 KHz whereas the Logitech Z-5500 Digital has a signal-to-noise ratio of 100 dB and a frequency response of 33 Hz to 20 KHz.
What does signal-to-noise ratio mean? I noticed that you have somewhat compared your Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic with the Logitech Z-5500 Digital, why is that so? Does it differ in quality ou quantity? confused


Varun wrote:Combining two Samsung HD502IJ SATA-II drives in AHCI mode, there's a NCQ enabled one-terabyte availability of hard drive storage space with 2 x 16 MB of fast cache.
What does NCQ enabled signify in the "Tera-scale Storage" subtitle, baby boy? scratch

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Wed 10 Jun 2009 - 22:27

Jeet wrote:Papaooooo.
Sa si mo pas ti koner.
Merci Sneha pu ki tone poz sa bann questions la.
Ek Varun eski 9800 (pa koner ki zafer, n'importe 'GT/GTX' ou soi pa koner kieter) ek 9400 GTX plis fort ki 8800 GTS.
This is how it goes for the Nvidia GeForce cards...

  • GTX/GX2/Ultra: High-end
  • GTS: High Performance
  • GT: Performance
  • GS: Mainstream
  • G: Low-end
Before, these were used as a suffix whereas now, they are used as a prefix. The past generation cards used 4 digits + the suffix as the naming scheme like 8800 GTS while now, they use a prefix + 3 digits like GTX 275.

In the past, the first digit in the name of a card represented its generation, while the second, third and fourth digits represented the performance of the card relative to others in the family. The fourth digit was always a zero and this has now been stripped for the new generation cards.

Having said that, it would be good to point out that the 9th generation of the GeForce cards were a little biased as they were rebranded GeForce 8 cards and a funny fact was that 8800 GTX was better than the 9800 GTX in terms of performance, but that was an exception.

So, a 9400 GT can't be better than a 8800 GTS while a 9800 GTX outperforms both. Nevertheless, if you have an overclocked 8800 GTS which can output a memory bandwidth higher than 70.4 GB/s then it can even beat the stock 9800 GTX.

Got it now, kid?

Sneha wrote:No problem, Zit... Wink

Well, I have some more queries concerning what has been stated in the website. In Hardware Overview, under the THX-certified Sound System subtitle, Varun has written:
The Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic has a signal-to-noise ratio of 109 dB and a frequency response of 10 Hz to 48 KHz whereas the Logitech Z-5500 Digital has a signal-to-noise ratio of 100 dB and a frequency response of 33 Hz to 20 KHz.
What does signal-to-noise ratio mean? I noticed that you have somewhat compared your Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeMusic with the Logitech Z-5500 Digital, why is that so? Does it differ in quality ou quantity? confused


Varun wrote:Combining two Samsung HD502IJ SATA-II drives in AHCI mode, there's a NCQ enabled one-terabyte availability of hard drive storage space with 2 x 16 MB of fast cache.
What does NCQ enabled signify in the "Tera-scale Storage" subtitle, baby boy? scratch
Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a technical term used to compare the level of a desired signal (such as music) to the level of background noise. The higher the ratio, the less obtrusive the background noise is.

NCQ (Native Command Queuing) is a technology used in SATA-II drives to improve performance and reliability as the transactional workload increases. When an application sends multiple commands to a drive, the drive can optimize the completion of these commands to reduce mechanical workload and improve performance. You can check this out for a better understanding.

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Fri 12 Jun 2009 - 10:59

It's clear in my head now, baby... Smile

Varun wrote:
Kavi wrote:Jeet eski ton deza fini zouer Need For Speed Underground 2 la?
MO criore mo ti fini sa zoué la 5-6 fwa ek mo ti montrer Prithvi( si mo ciore bien) ban loto la zot statistics tousa. Tou ti ful!!!..... Cool
Should I re-open the topic? Razz
I'm doing it myself. Razz

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Sat 4 Jul 2009 - 10:32

I've now fully updated the dedicated section concerning my computer on The Wonder Kid's Corner and you can check it here. Wink

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Mon 6 Dec 2010 - 14:07

Most of the links that you have posted are broken. Rolling Eyes

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Tue 7 Dec 2010 - 22:00

Yeah, I know and I have something cooking in my mind right now... Basketball

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Sat 11 Dec 2010 - 11:20

And what is that, hun? What a Face

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Naz on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 13:18


Lolz see this..
My only problem is that the voltage shown are false...
For 12V it shows 7.86 and i checked in bios, its 12.40 volt..
apart these everything seems fine Very Happy


Last edited by Naz on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 21:39; edited 4 times in total

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by vinesh on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 13:39

lol we made the ultimate cooling system for overclocked on 5 ghz on idle its -26 c as you can see above then on load its 100 c lol


Last edited by vinesh on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 21:29; edited 1 time in total

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by visham on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 16:01

orrrrrrrrrrr, u have a shitty sensor.

post cpufreq, bios screens, prime95 results, lerla nu kozer Very Happy

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Naz on Sun 12 Dec 2010 - 21:05

ALERT THIS CAN EXPAND YOUR MIND...
lOl

a little more than 5ghz is not badd lOl..



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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by simpleguy on Mon 13 Dec 2010 - 1:52

I suddenly feel so inadequate with my 2006-era PC.

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Varun on Sun 19 Dec 2010 - 23:56

Sneha wrote:Most of the links that you have posted are broken. Rolling Eyes
Varun wrote:Yeah, I know and I have something cooking in my mind right now... Basketball
Sneha wrote:And what is that, hun? What a Face
Here it is! Wink

Naz wrote:

Lolz see this..
My only problem is that the voltage shown are false...
For 12V it shows 7.86 and i checked in bios, its 12.40 volt..
apart these everything seems fine Very Happy
vinesh wrote:lol we made the ultimate cooling system for overclocked on 5 ghz on idle its -26 c as you can see above then on load its 100 c lol
visham wrote:orrrrrrrrrrr, u have a shitty sensor.

post cpufreq, bios screens, prime95 results, lerla nu kozer Very Happy
Both of the two cores of that Intel Core 2 Duo E7200 are on a shared die and it's impossible for one to be at -26° Celsius and the other to be at 52° Celsius at the same time. The only reason which seems palatable is that the sensor on the Asus motherboard is dying. During my 12+ years of experience with computers, I have seen lots of Asus motherboards with such problems and that's one of the those reasons why I have come to hate Asus.

Naz wrote:ALERT THIS CAN EXPAND YOUR MIND...
lOl

a little more than 5ghz is not badd lOl..


As visham already pointed out, the only way for us to believe you would be if you could demonstrate that fact via such an approach.

simpleguy wrote:I suddenly feel so inadequate with my 2006-era PC.
I also have a 2006-era PC though it was build in March 2007 and upgraded every now and then but it still kicks ass with its Intel P965 chipset. Check out my benchmarks.

On another note, now that we have a dedicated section for showcasing our PCs, I suggest we lock and archive this topic. What do you say, friends?

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sneha on Mon 20 Dec 2010 - 10:24

Yeps...

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Re: The Showdown: Personal Computers

Post by Sponsored content Today at 10:01


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